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Monthly Archives: February 2011

 

[photos by me.] our little goober in 2008 and now 2011.

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photo by jamie delaine photography.  today marks 6 months since our big day! time feels as though it has just flown by since i’ve been busy writing up my thesis and ryan was away in scotland for 3 months last fall.  i want to take this opportunity to again thank everyone who was a part of our day! we couldn’t have done it without the help of all of our fantastic family and friends!

[photos by me.] ryan and i had a great meal for valentine’s day! we bought fig and olive raincoast crisps and topped them with goat cheese, a rhubarb and vanilla preserve by vista d’oro (a beautiful farm in langley, bc that jeri took me to a few years ago) and a fresh mint leaf! deelicious! (the vista d’oro preserve can be found at some thrifty’s locations and at plenty – the epicurean pantry – here in victoria!) we followed our crackers and cheese with a caprese salad, then the main dish that ryan made for us! cumin and dijon mustard glazed pork tenderloin and roasted yams and potatoes! thanks ry!

ryan bought me a neat pair of feather earrings he found at the netloft on granville island (i love feathers!) and a jar of vanilla pears made by the mission hill winery (i’ve been wanting a jar for years! yum!). hope everyone had a happy valentine’s day!

[photo by me. scanning electron micrograph of shell of juvenile blue topsnail calliostoma ligatum.]

i have to apologize for my lack of posting as of late. my thesis is due in a few weeks and i’ve been madly writing, editing figures, pulling out my hair, etc. in order to get it all done! pictured above is a cleaned shell of one of the little goobers (one of the more frustrating goobers) i raised from adult goobers i collected from clover point, here in victoria.

i collected about 30 adult blue topsnails and warmed them up individually in custard cups to spawn eggs/sperm. out of 30 i had 3 males and 4 females successfully spawn! i took sperm from the males, made a sperm slurry and added it to the eggs of the females, then reared the embryos through until they were about two months old in incubators here in our lab at UVic.

the shell pictured above was cleaned with a household bleach dilution (to remove the snail’s tissue), washed with acetone, then air-dried and stuck down on a small stub using a cactus spine held with fine forceps (headache). this shell was approximately 150 µm  in length which is 0.15 mm. ugh.

very tedious process, but a very beautiful shell. the polygonal sculpturing on the shell is laid down when the snail is an embryo. once this embryo hatches and swims up to join the plankton, it stops secreting its shell until after metamorphosis, when it resorbs its swimming organ, settles down out of the water column, and it begins crawling with its foot!  You can see the resumption of shell secretion in the shell pictured above, marked by the large ridge, followed by the radial ridges formed on the shell (towards the right of the shell).

i thought i’d make a quick post showing the save-the-dates that ryan and i made for the wedding! we went to a nearby photobooth (they make them a lot smaller inside than i remember, or maybe i’ve gotten larger since high school?) and mailed the composite as a postcard!